From the book lists at Adware Report:

All information current as of 01:28:51 Pacific Time, Sunday, 12 December 2004.

Beginning Visual C# (Programmer to Programmer)

   by Karli Watson / David Espinosa / Zach Greenvoss / Jacob Hammer Pedersen / Christian Nagel / Jon D. Reid / Matthew Reynolds / Morgan Skinner / Eric White

  Paperback:
    Wrox
    20 August, 2002

   US$26.39 

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Editorial description(s):

Book Info
Designed specifically for programming Microsoft's new platform, the .NET Framework. An indispensable guide as you learn to write C# programs, gradually explaining the key concepts of Visual C# and .NET as your skills develop, with exercises at the end of chapters to test yourself. Softcover.



From the Publisher
Beginning C# provides a painless introduction to C# for beginners or relatively inexperienced programmers, who want to move to the .NET Framework from languages that don't support modern object-oriented programming techniques, and have access to Visual Studio .NET or Visual C# .NET Standard Edition. This book is for everyone who is tired of C# books that assume ten-plus years of C++ experience. Beginning Visual C# is a new edition of Beginning C#, revised and tested for .NET v1.0. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.



From the Back Cover
By using this book with Visual Studio® .NET you';ll come to understand the fundamentals of the C# language and learn to program the .NET Framework. We';ll help you succeed - from your first steps in the language up to the point where you are ready to write real world C# applications.

With Beginning Visual C#, you will learn how to use Visual C# from first principles. Visual C# is an object-oriented programming language, designed specifically for programming Microsoft';s new platform, the .NET Framework. You';ll quickly and easily learn how to write Visual C# code and create your own applications - for both Windows and the Web.

This book will be an indispensable guide as you learn to write C# programs, gradually explaining the key concepts of Visual C# and .NET as your skills develop, with exercises at the end of chapters to test yourself. Starting with a thorough tutorial of the Visual C# language and object-oriented programming, you will progress to learn how to apply your understanding to programming the .NET Framework.

What you need to know

Beginning Visual C# is ideal for beginners with little background in programming, or relatively inexperienced programmers who want to move from a language that doesn';t support object-oriented programming techniques. The book moves at a fast enough pace that if you have programmed in another language, then you will still find the book valuable.

You will need to have access to either Visual Studio .NET or Visual C# .NET Standard Edition.

What you will learn from this book

With clear explanations and hands-on examples, you will learn about the following:


Wrox Beginning books are crafted to make learning programming languages and technologies easier than you think. Whether you';re taking your first steps in programming, or broadening your skills and knowledge, Wrox Beginning books provide a structured, tutorial format that will guide you through all the techniques involved. Each concept is first explained, giving you a solid understanding of the material. Your new understanding is then applied to practical project examples - taking you to the point where you can develop professional applications that you can be proud of.



About the Author
Karli Watson is an in-house author for Wrox Press with a penchant for multicolored clothing. He started out with the intention of becoming a world famous nanotechnologist, so perhaps one day you might recognize his name as he receives a Nobel Prize. For now, though, Karli's computing interests include all things mobile, and upcoming technologies such as C#. He can often be found preaching about these technologies at conferences, as well as after hours in drinking establishments. Karli is also a snowboading enthusiast, and wishes he had a cat.

Marco Bellinaso is a freelance software developer who lives in a small town close to Venice, Italy. He has been working with VB, C/C++ and other Microsoft tools for several years, specializing in User Interface, API, ActiveX/COM design and programming, and is now spending all his time on the .NET Framework with both C# and VB.NET. He is a team member of VB-2-The-Max (www.vb2themax.com) for which he helps writing articles and commercial software. He is also a contributing editor for two Italian leading programming magazines: Computer Programming and Visual Basic Journal (VBPJ Italian licensee). You can reach him at mbellinaso@vb2themax.com.

Ollie Cornes has been working with the Internet and the Microsoft platform since the early 90's. In 1999 he co-founded a business-to-business Internet company and until recently was their Chief Technical Officer.
Prior to that his various roles involved programming, technical authoring, network management, writing, leading development projects and consulting. He has worked with Demon Internet, Microsoft, Saab, Travelstore and Vodafone. Ollie holds a degree in computer science and is Microsoft certified.
When he’s not working he spends his time devouring books on human potential and practicing Chinese internal martial arts, meditation and healing. He also juggles fire and knives, but cannot yet ride a unicycle.

David Espinosa is a Senior Programmer and owner of Espinosa Consulting. Born in Barcelona, Spain, David moved to the United States at an early age. He attended the University of Nevada and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science.
David concentrates on Microsoft technologies and tools. In 1999, he worked with Microsoft as a Lead Author for the Desktop Visual FoxPro Certification Exam. Recently, David has been focusing on E-Commerce and data integration solutions and works for the a manufacturing company based out of Reno, Nevada.

Zach Greenvoss, MCSD is a Senior Consultant with Magenic Technologies, a Microsoft Gold Certified consulting firm in Northern California. He specializes in middle-tier architecture and implementation, utilizing various technologies including COM+, MSMQ, BizTalk, and XML. Before Magenic, Zach worked at the Defense Manpower Data Center in Monterey California, where he developed client-server applications for the Department of Defense. Zach and his wife Amanda enjoy globetrotting, caving, gaming and playing with their two cats. He can be reached at zachg@magenic.com.

Christian Nagel is working as a trainer and consultant for Global Knowledge, the largest independent information technology training provider. Having worked with PDP 11, VMS, and Unix platforms, he looks back on more than 15 years of experience in the field of software development. With his profound knowledge of Microsoft technologies – he's certified as a Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT), Solution Developer (MCSD), and Systems Engineer (MCSE) – he enjoys teaching others programming and architecting distributed solutions. As founder of the now-called .NET User Group Austria and as MSDN Regional Director he is speaker at European conferences (TechEd, VCDC), and more and more addressed by many developers. You can contact Christian via his web site at http://christian.nagel.net.

Jacob Hammer Pedersen is a systems developer at ICL Invia – a member of the Fujitsu Group.
He pretty much started programming when he was able to spell the word 'basic', which, incidentally is the language he's primarily using today. He started programming the PC in the early 90s, using Pascal, but soon changed his focus to C++, which still holds his interest. In the mid 90s his focus changed again, this time to Visual Basic. In the summer of 2000 he discovered C# and has been happily exploring it ever since.
Primarily working on the Microsoft platforms, other expertise includes MS Office development, COM, COM+ and Visual Basic.Net.

Jon D. Reid is the Chief Technology Officer for Micro Data Base Systems, Inc. (www.mdbs.com), maker of the TITANIUMä Database Engine and GURUâ Expert System tool. His primary current activity is developing database tools for the Microsoft.NET environment. He was editor for the C++ and Object Query Language (OQL) components of the Object Data Management Group (ODMG) standard, and has co-authored other Wrox titles including ADO.NET Programmer's Reference and Professional SQL Server 2000 XML. When not working, writing, or bicycling, he enjoys spending time with his wife and two young sons. Jon would like to thank his family and the team at Wrox (especially Adrian, Julian, Avril, and Rob) for their support and encouragement.

Mathew Reynolds After working with Wrox Press on a number of projects since 1999, Matthew is now an in-house author for Wrox Press writing about and working with virtually all aspects of Microsoft.NET. He's also a regular contributor to Wrox's ASPToday, C#Today and Web Services Architect.  He lives and works in North London and can be reached on matthewr@wrox.com.

Morgan Skinner started his computing career at a tender age on a ZX80 at school, where he was underwhelmed by some code his teacher had put together and decided that he could do better in assembly language. After getting hooked on Z80 (which he considers much better than 6502), he graduated through the schools ZX81's to his own ZX Spectrum.
Since then Morgan has used a variety of languages and platforms, including VAX Macro Assembler, Pascal, Modula2, Smalltalk, x86 assembly language, PowerBuilder, C/C++, Visual Basic, PL/SQL, TSQL, and currently C#. He's managed to stay in the same company for nearly 12 years, largely due to the diversity of his job and having a good working environment.

Eric White is an independent consultant, specializing in managing offshore development with some hotshot developers in India. Having written well over a million lines of code, Eric has over 20 years experience in building Management Information Systems, accounting systems, and other types of fat-client and n-tier database applications. Eric has particular interest in Object-Oriented design methodologies, including use case analysis, UML, and design patterns. After years of working with too many varieties of technologies to list, he is currently specializing in C#, VB.NET, ASP.NET, ADO.NET, XML, COM+, GDI+, SQL Server, and other Microsoft technologies.



Book Description
What is this book about?

With Beginning Visual C#, you will learn how to use Visual C# from first principles. Visual C# is an object-oriented programming language designed specifically for programming Microsoft's new platform, the .NET Framework. You'll quickly and easily learn how to write Visual C# code and create your own applications — for both Windows and the Web.

What does this book cover?

With clear explanations and hands-on examples, you will learn about the following topics:


This book will be an indispensable guide as you learn to write C# programs, gradually explaining the key concepts of Visual C# and .NET as your skills develop, with exercises at the end of chapters to test yourself. Starting with a thorough tutorial of the Visual C# language and object-oriented programming, you will progress to learn how to apply your understanding to programming the .NET Framework.

Who is this book for?

Beginning Visual C# is ideal for beginners with little background in programming, and for relatively inexperienced programmers who want to move from a language that doesn't support object-oriented programming techniques. The book moves at a fast enough pace that if you have programmed in another language, then you will still find the book valuable.

What do you need to use this book?

Note that Beginning Visual C# requires you to have access to either Visual Studio .NET or Visual C# .NET Standard Edition.




Reader review(s):

Clearly written, complete, accurate, October 23, 2002
... I must say I read and checked the book from cover to cover - it is very well written and extremely accurate. The book is mainly aimed at programmers who use Visual C# to develop Windows Applications so it covers in detail the techniques of programming with Windows Forms, user controls, common dialogs and so on.

Being a beginning book, it spends a lot of time coverig the basic concepts about C# and .NET programming (in fact, it starts with them). However, unlike with the other beginners books (I've seen most of them at the work place), it goes well beyond the basics and presents most features you'll likely need when developing Windows applications: deploying your application, accessing databases using ADO.NET, working with files, playing with GDI+ and much more. At the end it even has two chapters on ASP.NET and Web Services which are good to be read just to make an idea what are these all about, even if you're not currently doing any web programming.

I highly recommend this book to programmers willing to read the chapters in sequential order, because most of them build upon the theory taught in the preceding ones. If you have time to do that, this book should be your primary choice. If you already have experience with C# and you need a reference book (or an advanced book), Professional C# is a better choice.

Covers more than needed, which can be both good and bad, March 13, 2003
This book is excellent for anyone with little programming expericence. If you have ZERO experience, then I recommend starting with on of the "...for Dummies" books first, as the terminology in this book may be hard to grasp at first. But if you're moving over from C++, Java, or VB, this is a great place to start. In fact, this book contains much more needed for just beginning, and by the end of the read you should be able to write a full-fledged Windows app with little problems.

The downsides of the book are few, but important to note. First off, the author doesn't spend enough time visually describing how OOP (object oriented programming) works. Before you know it, you'll be diving into classes, methods, delegates, and events before fully understanding basic concepts. Chapters 9-12 are by far the most difficult in the book to follow. Most everything else is cake. Also, because the book is just loaded with information, it may be hard for a beginner to differentiate from a beginners topic and a more advanced topic that you may never use.

Overall the book is a great read and I recommend it for anyone who wants to jump into C#. I easily finished it within less than a month with a pretty sound basic knowledge of what C# is about. After reading this, I recommend buying Professional C# (Second Edition) from WROX along with The C# Reference book they also put out. With those three books, you have a foundation to do just about anything you can think of.

All over the place and not a beginner book, May 5, 2004
I'm not from a publishing company or anybody affiliated with other books, thus right of the bat I am not going to recommend any other C# book, since I ordered one, but am waiting to review it.

First of all my background is COBOL for 15 years and have dabbled with VB 6.0, so I wanted to dive into the world of OO programming and threw my hat into C# instead of JAVA and was looking for a TRUE Beginning book that wasn't too trivial but wasn't an intermediate book as well.

As far as this book, there are some people who know the language, but cannot teach others the basics and that is where this author falls into.

It goes all over the place instead of starting with the very basics and building an application where at the end of the book you can actually use the application and learn from it.

I picked up this book off a suggestion that Wrox books are very good, well this one is a dud.

The author doesn't even get into Windows Programming until half way through the book, which I had thought C# was primarly used for (albeit ASP.NET as well).

This book was written for somebody oriented with other OO languages (JAVA, C++) and was switching over.

I wanted a book written for a technical person who has some programming background, but not so easy and basic as the "For Dummies" or "Teach Yourself in 21 days".

The title fools you into believing it is for a Beginner, but buyer beware !!..The best way to really pick a book is to go to a Borders or Barnes and Noble and sit down for an hour or so and read it to see the authors writing style to see if it fits your learning style.

I am getting Murachs C# book, just because I had their Mainframe books which were good, so once I read the Murach book, I'll also write an honest review for those interested or you can go to your local bookstore and review it to form your own opinion.

Beginning c# as easy as pie, January 21, 2003
I purchased the 'visual blueprint for c# 'first went thru it
in three weeks. This book was like the dummies and then
I bought 'the "begining c#' and went through it like
lightning.
This is the best book I see for getting you on yur feet with no
programming experience and the examples were certainly
very easy to follow.
I have no complaints.

Great book but remember it's designed for beginners, March 24, 2003
Great book if your are new to programming. However, it is, just like the title implies, designed for beginners. If you have any C++ or Java experience you might want to skip this book and go straight to Professional C#.

Better than 90% of C# books in the market, November 9, 2002
I have C# how to program because i found it about 1500 , So i said it's great book and it were until chapter 9 but after that i think the author forget that this book aimed for beginners not professional C++ progammers, But with Beginning Visual C# i found the programming Easy and i'm happy with the stucture of this book it's 100% for beginners and the authors are the best.

No cd or downloadable code for exercises, July 31, 2003
Let me quote the Wrox website: "The exercise answers to this and several other books are not amongst the files we've been able to recover from the old Wrox servers, yet. We're still trying to find them, or to recover them from some other source so we can repost them."
It is two months later and there is still no code for the exercises at the end of the chapters. The sample code is still available, however.

Outstanding!, July 21, 2003
This book is outstanding! I never thought I would change over from Visual Basic but I am convinced C# is for me! This book covers everything from the basics of the .NET framework, all the way up the ladder. I would highly recommend this book to the Visual Basic crowd!

Slow + No answers to exercises, May 5, 2004
This book is quite easy to read for a beginner. However, for a true beginner who needs to check answers to the exercises provided in the book...well, that's another story. The authors forgot who their audience is and just like that they decided not to provide answers to the exercises given at the end of the chapters. This made the book quite a bit challenging for me, and the so called "P2P" forums in the publisher's website are many times not useful at all. Before buying this book, browse through all of the complaints posted in these "P2P" forums and you'll know what I'm talking about.

Otherwise, the book is presented in a fairly comprehensive way for a beginner to understand.

Very Detailed and Enjoyable Book!, July 16, 2004
I've bought many C-Sharp books and I must say., this book is awesome! Where as in other beginning books a lot of details are missing -this book is fine tunned and includes many details about the C# language that are just simply not covered in other books! This book is enjoyable and keeps you thinking.

After completing this book, you will have good experience with C# and ready to move on to more advanced books. You get a taste of different C# topics -towards the end of the book. After completing this book, it will be your choice to go the way of Windows Form programming or ASP.NET, and associated topics in those fields. This book gets 5 stars for an introductory book. (...)This book assumes you know your way around an IDE, which is pretty easy to figure out. Enough said.








Not That Great, April 20, 2004
I don't understand why the other reviewers are so positive about this book. It's drier than crackers in the Sahara and it spends way too much time on Windows Forms. It also assumes you're very familiar with VS.NET. A "Beginning" book should do a lot more hand-holding than this book does. In summary, I hated it.

Good book for beginners, April 17, 2004
I've read the first ten chapters of this book and I think its one of the best Wrox books I own. The author says you don't need any prior programming experience, but it sure helps if you do. The books covers everything, but it's tough reading for someone new to Object Oriented Programming (OOP) - I come from an ASP and JavaScript background. The only problem I have with this book is that the answers to the questions at the end of the chapters are missing from the Wrox web site (Wiley Publishing is the new owner), which is a real shame for a book this good.

Hey, Karli. Get a haircut !, April 12, 2004
Is this really the best way to learn C#? Chapter after bloody chapter about the nuts & bolts of every variable type, class contruct and OOP concept. The reader tests their new-found knowledge building console apps until Forms are mercifully introduced on page 340.

I think a much better way to learn is to start with a simple form app (like "Hello, World") and introduce new material step-by-step.

Not that this is a bad book. Hustler magazine doesn't show this level of detail. The authors explore every nook & crevice of a subject and there are plenty of code snippets to illustrate each new concept.

This could be a good companion book. But not a first book. If you want to get off the ground quickly, start with "Windows Forms Programming in C#" by Chris Sells. Otherwise, this book will keep you on the launch pad for months.

Beginning Visual C#, November 18, 2002
Definitely a worth while purchase. I would recommend it to anyone who wants to learn C#.

If you don't want to work the basics--this is not for you, November 3, 2004
I don't comprehend the criticism of this book where the complaint implies the instruction within is too meager. There are twenty-four chapters, eight hundred forty-four pages and it's not fluff. It is an excellently structured "Beginner Level" book which lays a foundation over a broad expanse of C# territory. Each chapter explains principles, leads you through hands-on examples, recaps where the principles are implemented in the examples and then tests your comprehension with exercises at the end.

C# is not a casual topic and this book is not a casual read. You gain great insight when you work the code examples and answer the exercises provided. Between my workday and playtime, it took me three months to complete this book, cover to cover. I am confidant with the basics, such as ADO.NET, ASP.NET or XML handling, to investigate more advanced, specialized C# books now.

Finally, a change of publishers did cause the answers to the chapter review exercises to disappear from the web for a good while. But they're in the Peer-2-Peer forum at the WROX website now, listed under this book title as the topic.


Ek Dam Chakkaass, March 19, 2004
Well, don't worry, the title of this review are only for Bomboits( Mumbai India). This book is really really good.
If you want to learn C# using Visual Studio.NET this book is for you. Remember I said Visual Studio.NET and again Visual Studio.NET, and that's why I am giving it 5 stars(Amazon.com has only five stars for the highest ratings) . I don't know of any software development company who would hire you to program in C# and without using Visual Studio.NET.So this book is for professional programmers , REMEMBER professional programmer use RAD tools to program.


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